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2010 Sloan Research Fellowships Announced


The Alfred P. Sloan Research Foundation has announced the winners of the 2010 Sloan Research Fellowships, 118 early-career scientists and researchers whose distinguished performance marks a unique potential to make substantial contributions to their fields.

The Sloan Research Fellowships seek to stimulate fundamental research by early-career scientists and scholars of outstanding promise. These two-year fellowships are awarded yearly to 118 researchers in recognition of distinguished performance and a unique potential to make substantial contributions to their field.

The size of the award is $50,000 for the two-year period. Funds are awarded directly to the Fellow's institution and may be used by the Fellow for such purposes as equipment, technical assistance, professional travel, trainee support, or any other activity directly related to the Fellow's research.

2010 Sloan Research Fellows in the area of computer science are:

  • Thomas L. Griffiths, University of California at Berkeley
  • Rupak Majumdar, University of California at Los Angeles
  • Jason I. Hong, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Eitan Grinspun, Columbia University
  • David S. Bindel Cornell University
  • C. Karen Liu, Georgia Tech
  • Karrie Karahalios, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
  • Jonathan Kelner, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Constantinos Daskalakis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Nickolai Zeldovich, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ben Taskar, University of Pennsylvania
  • David M. Blei, Princeton University
  • Amin Saberi, Stanford University
  • Brent Waters, University of Texas at Austin
  • Luis Ceze, University of Washington
  • Li Zhang, University of Wisconsin at Madison

Established in 1934 by Alfred Pritchard Sloan Jr., then-President and Chief Executive Officer of the General Motors Corporation, the Foundation makes grants in support of original research and education in science, technology, engineering, mathematics and economic performance.


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