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Amazon Web Services Announces Relational DB Service


AMAZON WEB SERVICES ANNOUNCES AMAZON RELATIONAL DATABASE SERVICE " A RELATIONAL DATABASE IN THE CLOUD


Amazon Web Services has introduced Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS), a web service intended to make it easy to set up, operate, and scale relational databases in the cloud. According to AWS, Amazon RDS provides cost-efficient and resizable capacity while automating time-consuming database administration tasks, freeing users to focus on their application and their business. There are no up-front investments required, and you pay only for the resources you use.

"For almost two years, many AWS customers have taken advantage of the simplicity, reliability, and seamless scalability that Amazon SimpleDB provides; however, many customers have told us that their applications require a relational database. That's why we built Amazon RDS, which combines a familiar relational database with automated management and the instant scalability of the AWS cloud," said Adam Selipsky, Vice President, Amazon Web Services.

Amazon RDS provides a fully featured MySQL database, so the code, applications, and tools that developers use today with their existing MySQL databases work seamlessly with Amazon RDS. The service automatically handles common database administration tasks such as setup and provisioning, patch management, and backup - storing the backups for a user-defined retention period. Customers also have the flexibility to scale the compute and storage resources associated with their database instance through a simple API call. Amazon RDS is easy to deploy and simple to manage.

"I found Amazon RDS to be a very efficient way to deploy MySQL, and a natural fit for cloud-based application deployment. The instance is up and running in minutes, and very sensible defaults are baked in. The APIs provide streamlined administration, with an ability to programmatically automate administration functions — which is a key feature in cloud-based applications," said David Tompkins, Sr. Computer Scientist at Adobe Systems Advanced Technology Labs. "Most importantly, Amazon RDS provides pain-free scalability - which is typically one of the most time-consuming and expensive aspects of database deployment."

For customers whose applications require relational storage, but want to reduce the time spent on database management, Amazon RDS automates common administrative tasks to reduce complexity and total cost of ownership. Amazon RDS automatically backs up a customer's database and maintains the database software, allowing customers to spend more time on application development. With the native database access Amazon RDS provides, customers get the programmatic familiarity, tooling and application compatibility of a traditional RDBMS. Customers also benefit from the flexibility of being able to scale the compute resources or storage capacity associated with a Relational Database Instance via a single API call.

With Amazon RDS, customers still control the database settings that are specific to their business (including the schema, indices, and performance tuning). Customers also take an active role in the scaling decisions for their database -- they tell the service when they want to add more storage or change to a larger

Separately, AWS is also lowering prices on all Amazon EC2 On-Demand compute instances, effective on November 1st. Charges for Linux-based instances will drop 15% -- a small Linux instance will now cost just 8.5 cents per hour, compared to the previous price of 10 cents per hour.

Along with these announcements, AWS is also introducing a new family of High-Memory Instances for Amazon EC2. This new instance family further expands the available selection of computing configurations for Amazon EC2, helping customers to choose the CPU capacity, memory resources, and networking throughput that their applications require. High-Memory Instances are designed to be used with memory-intensive workloads such as databases, caching, and rendering, and are optimized for low-latency, high-throughput performance.


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