Channels ▼

Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz

Dr. Dobb's Bloggers

Google Chrome -The browser is the new Desktop (2)

November 18, 2009

You’ve probably read/heard that yesterday Google held a press event on making the ChromeOS the’ve been working on an open source project. Actually they’ve announced ChromeOS back in July, but now that the source is available it is making more waves. This is a very logical move for Google, and even though I think that they will need to enable some local/offline capabilities before it would be a viable option.

As usual* for Google, they are not the first in this space (If you want to get a webbook today you can try out litl, which looks like a very nice,  or the GOS cloud on the Gigabyte M912)  - but Google’s size and position in the market makes this interesting for everybody.

Anyway, I am almost thinking about a career change to analyst as I’ve been says that’s what they’ve up to since they released Chrome in Sept. 2008. when I published Google Chrome -The browser is the new Desktop. Here’s an excerpt:

Now,in my opinion, Google makes a bold move to change the rules and re-define the playground - if webapss need to run on the desktop, let's make the browser the new desktop.
What makes me say that? because it is focused on application (see the comics),because the browser runs each tab in its own process, because it has a process monitor, because it is a link on the google home page...

From the chrome "OS" point of view we can look at javascript,HTML etc. as the IL (bytecode in java speak) on which the application run. This makes cross-compilers like GWT and the good side of MS Volta (vs. the bad side) the next abstraction layer. I expect these will be more significant in the future

On the same note, it is probably good time to provide a link to a presentation on the future of PCs I’ve created in 2007, which highlights some of the trends that are more apparent today in moving to the cloud


* the most obvious example is of course search (altavista, hotbot etc. have all been there before..), a more recent example is the free GPS turn-by-turn where Waze (an Israeli company by they way) is already there but Google’s announcement is considered disruptive

Now,in my opinion, Google makes a bold move to change the rules and re-define the playground - if webapss need to run on the desktop, let's make the browser the new desktop.
What makes me say that? because it is focused on application (see the comics),because the browser runs each tab in its own process, because it has a process monitor, because it is a link on the google home page...

From the chrome "OS" point of view we can look at javascript,HTML etc. as the IL (bytecode in java speak) on which the application run. This makes cross-compilers like GWT and the good side of MS Volta (vs. the bad side) the next abstraction layer. I expect these will be more significant in the future

On the same note, it is probably good time to provide a link to a presentation on the future of PCs I’ve created in 2007, which highlights some of the trends that are more apparent today in moving to the cloud


* the most obvious example is of course search (altavista, hotbot etc. have all been there before..), a more recent example is the free GPS turn-by-turn where Waze (an Israeli company by they way) is already there but Google’s announcement is considered disruptive

Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 


Video