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Jelastic Adds Advanced Ruby Support


Jelastic has announced the general availability of its Platform-as-Infrastructure (PaI) 2.2. The multi-language PaaS adds Ruby support, a new API, and a one-click app marketplace.

Ruby architects and developers can deploy new or legacy applications to the cloud without any code changes, making it theoretically usable for more demanding agile development and DevOps practices.

Jelastic PaI 2.2 offers BYOA (Bring Your Own App) for Java, PHP, and now Ruby. The company confirms that there is support for any Ruby app, Ruby version, or library engine including Ruby on Rails, Sinatra, Rack, Ramaze, Exex.JS, all ruby gems, JRuby, and GIT/SVN, without the need to change or recode, eliminating vendor lock-in and saving countless hours of recoding.

In terms of high-performance Ruby support, Jelastic offers the latest Ruby app servers with load balancing. For example, Jelastic offers configuration of Unicorn, Puma, or Passenger with NGINX via the GUI or API.

According to the firm's own press statement: Unlike other PaaS providers, Jelastic's Ruby support offers full access to configuration files for performance tuning and customization, providing leading flexibility for developers and DevOps.

Looking at the new one-click app marketplace, this offers 200+ apps for set-up and deployment from Jelastic's GUI, automatically installing and configuring the application. ISVs and hosting service providers can also use a Jelastic "widget" to provide one-click access to applications for their customer. Beta support for Python and support for JDK version 8 also feature.

"There is strong, growing demand among developers, IT operations, and DevOps teams to leverage multiple languages and multiple infrastructures without sacrificing time-to-market, quality, or uptime — the type of service provided by Jelastic," said Jay Lyman, 451 Research Senior Analyst. "With today's market driving faster software development and deployment cycles, we expect the trend of polyglot programming and this demand to continue."


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