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Jolt Awards 2014: The Best Testing Tools

, June 03, 2014 The best testing tools of the past 12 months
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Productivity Award: SmartBear TestComplete 10.1

SmartBear TestComplete 10, a product that has made it to the final round of many previous Jolt Awards in this category,  shows some important changes in the most recent version. The new product design enables this suite to improve mobile testing capabilities and to stay up-to-date in several other areas I'll touch on in a moment. The TestComplete Platform provides a test IDE with excellent automated testing, recording, integration, and reporting features. The new Technology Modules provide support for the most popular programming languages and platforms. TestComplete offers a range of scripting languages so that you don't need to learn a completely different language to tune your testing scenarios.

Support for third-party controls in both the updated desktop and Web modules has been expanded to cover many of the most popular software lifecycle products. But even with the new capabilities, TestComplete is still an easy-to-use suite: You can quickly specify the system under test, start recording, and then use scripting to fine-tune the tests.

The biggest improvements in this edition are in the mobile module, which includes support for both Android and iOS native applications and provides full object access for instrumented applications. (Windows 8 and 8.1 store apps are also supported.) By this means, you can script test your apps at the object level. Unfortunately, if you develop mobile applications with this year's Jolt Mobile award winner, Xamarin, you have to buy a third-party library to script test at the object level for either Xamarin.Android or Xamarin.iOS. My only other concern is that the TestComplete IDE is a Windows-only proposition, which might not suit everyone's needs or preferences.

Other than that, though, TestComplete will provide most sites all they need in a testing platform, and it does so with a remarkably good quality of implementation.  

— Gastón Hillar






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