Channels ▼
RSS

Design

Micro Focus Updates Modernization Workbench



Micro Focus has launched version 2.1 of its Modernization Workbench, a decision-making tool for understanding and analysing existing IT applications. The Modernization Workbench gives managers and analysts insight into how their business-critical applications are structured, allowing business users to identify corporate priorities and quickly translate these into development actions. It provides insight into complex applications (from Cobol to Java), giving development teams a centralized knowledgebase of intelligence about their application portfolio, accelerating the execution of development and modernzation activities.

Modernization Workbench 2.1, previously produced by Relativity Technologies, is the first product release from the Relativity stable since Micro Focus' acquisition of the company. The new version extends support for large application portfolios, and demonstrates a commitment to continuous improvement of Relativity's product portfolio. Users can now deploy the Modernization Workbench on either IBM DB2 or Oracle, and it also supports Windows Vista.

Developers can use the Modernization Workbench to view detailed application documentation and visualisations at the click of a button. IT managers can overlay business views and descriptions onto applications to guarantee that development efforts are more closely-aligned with business strategy. Other benefits include improving application quality by highlighting code inefficiencies, locating dead code and applications for retirement, and reducing risk by identifying dependencies between applications.

"Understanding the complexities at the heart of an organisation's application portfolio is a crucial part of the modernization process, and essential to understanding and enhancing the value of these IT assets," says Micro Focus CTO Stuart McGill. "The Modernization Workbench will help Micro Focus continue to offer its customers the most complete modernization solutions available."


Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 

Video