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Arnon Rotem-Gal-Oz

Dr. Dobb's Bloggers

Random Hacks of Kindness

November 15, 2010

I don't usually go promoting events and such but I thought I'd make an exception for this one

I've got the notice below from Vivi-Anne Kelly the Operational Lead for RHoK and I am bringing it as is:

December 4th and 5th, hackers will make the world a better place Looking to make a difference? Google, Microsoft, The World Bank and Yahoo! are inviting software developers, independent hackers and students to participate in the Random Hacks of Kindness (RHoK) event on December 4 and 5 in over a dozen locations around the world. This progressive initiative brings together volunteer hackers and experts in disaster risk management for a weekend-long hacking event to create software solutions that can help mitigate or respond to disasters around the world and save lives. RHoK is platform agnostic and encourages the development of open source software solutions. The December 4th and 5th RHoK event will be held simultaneously in multiple locations around the world. U.S. locations include Atlanta, Chicago, New York, and Seattle. International locations are Toronto, Canada; Aarhus, Denmark; Berlin, Germany; Bangalore, India; Jakarta, Indonesia; Nairobi, Kenya; Lusaka, Zambia; Bogota, Colombia; and Sao Paolo, Brazil. RHoK is an opportunity to meet and work with top software developers and experts from around the world, create new applications, and maybe even win some prizes while you are at it. The first RHoK event, RHoK #0, held in November 2009, resulted in applications that were later used during the devastating earthquakes in Haiti and Chile. RHoK #1 - held simultaneously in six countries around the world in June 2010 - produced a tool that allows engineers to easily visualize landslide risk to help guide urban and rural development and building planning. This application is currently being piloted in the Caribbean by the World Bank. Join us on December 4th and 5th. Visit www.rhok.org to register.

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