Channels ▼
RSS

Design

This Week's Developer Reading List


101 Windows Phone 7 Apps, Volume I: Developing Apps 1-50
by Adam Nathan
Microsoft developer Adam Nathan walks readers through the process of building 101 Silverlight applications. The edition includes online access to the full source code and related assets, as well as tips, warnings, and advice. Volume I contains the first 50 apps and covers fully exploiting phone features such as the application bar, hardware/software keyboards, multi-touch, accelerometer, microphone, and more; using rich controls such as pivots, panoramas, and controls in free toolkits, such as date/time pickers, toggle switches, charts, and graphs; and building your own custom controls, including popular ones missing from the platform, such as a checkable list box, multi-select picker box, and color picker. Volume II is slated for release this fall.
http://is.gd/V1FcTj

Break Away with Intel Atom Processors: A Guide to Architecture Migration
by Lori Matassa and Max Domeika
In this book, frequent Dr. Dobb's contributors Lori Matassa and Max Domeika provide insight into architecture migration, discussing real world software migration issues and highlighting them with case studies. Pertinent topics that are at the heart of the software migration, such as techniques to port code originally written for other processor architectures, as well as capturing the benefits of Intel Atom platform technologies are discussed. The reality is that architecture migration is not a one-size-fits-all activity and developers must understand all of the decisions that comprise a successful migration. The authors deliver this information as a handbook to your software migration plan and project activities.
http://is.gd/nglyDj

JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, Sixth Edition
by David Flanagan
This sixth edition offers comprehensive coverage of ECMAScript 5 (the new language standard) and also the new APIs introduced in HTML5. The chapters on functions and classes have been completely rewritten and updated to match current best practices. A new chapter covers language extensions and subsets.
http://is.gd/MOtOEc


Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 

Video