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VMware Releases Micro Cloud Foundry 1.2


VMware has released the Micro Cloud Foundry 1.2 open source cloud Platform-as-a-Service technology. Provided under the Apache License 2.0 and predominantly written in Ruby, this is a new iteration of the complete version of Cloud Foundry that runs in a virtual machine on a developer's PC (or Mac).

The company says that this latest release has been built on the back of community feedback to include improved networking capabilities. The new functions are designed to enable developers to run their Micro Cloud Foundry instance when either or connected to the Internet.

This new "run anywhere" functionality, matched with additional enhancements focused on Java debugging, is hoped to broaden interest in Cloud Foundry as it now supports up-to-date versions of all languages/frameworks and services. There is also the option to enable/disable application services per individual developer needs. The new release of Micro Cloud Foundry has also been updated to include new runtimes (including Node.js 0.6) in the CloudFoundry.com public service.

Note: Specifically, the change here is that the default network setting has been changed to the "offline configuration”" so that Micro Cloud Foundry can work consistently anywhere. The below paragraph is taken directly from the official Cloud Foundry blog:

Java developers can now debug a Java application running in Micro Cloud Foundry with a Java debugger similarly to how they have always done with locally running applications. The user can set break points in the source code, suspend and resume running applications, view the application stack, and perform code stepping operations. To enable Java debugging users can either push an application through the Cloud Foundry command-line (VMC) using the 'vmc push -d' command option or use the built-in debugger of SpringSource Tool Suite (STS). An upcoming release of STS will further improve Java and Grails debugging with Micro Cloud Foundry applications to a seamless user experience."


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