Channels ▼

Developer Reading List: The Must-Have Books for JavaScript

, February 12, 2013 The best books for learning the basics, becoming expert, and and writing complete apps in JavaScript
  • E-mail
  • Print

jQuery

jQuery, jQuery UI, and jQuery Mobile, by Adrianan de Jonge and Phil Dutson

One of the first experiences developers have when using jQuery is to rush into it and try to solve as many problems as they can using the framework. This does not always end well, and after pulling back, they become more selective and use jQuery for the tasks to which it is best suited. This volume assumes the reader knows jQuery; it then provides dozens of recipes for leveraging the framework to solve common problems both in Web apps and in mobile apps. Whether it's simple tasks like adding content by using append() or changing the look and feel of mobile app on-the-fly, the recipes are short, well explained, and intented for immediate application.

Murach's JavaScript and JQuery, Zak Rubalcaba and Mike Murach

This too is a recipe-oriented book that teaches jQuery. Every two pages cover one problem and illustrate how you would use jQuery to address the issue. While this means it could be used for reference later, the aim of the book is really to teach jQuery in an intensely hands-on way. It succeeds in this and probably provides that fastest way to learn and master the framework. Like the previous book, it also cover jQuery Mobile.






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.