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Free Access To Stackato 20GB Cluster In Production


ActiveState has announced the release of Stackato 3.4, with an updated free Micro Cloud license to enable Stackato clusters using up to 20GB of RAM. The company insists that this product is currently the world's leading independent Cloud Foundry distribution.

For those new to the product, Stackato is a commercially supported Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) built with (and on top of) various open source components such as Cloud Foundry and Docker. The product provides built-in languages, frameworks, and services on one single cloud application platform.

This new version focuses on options for high availability and load balancing of applications in production, free of charge. It offers an "accurate assessment" of how apps can perform in a production environment.

Stackato enables the development of apps in any language, automatically configures the language runtimes and web frameworks, and provides a best-in-class dashboard with analytics and social monitoring tools.

"Stackato harnesses proven open source components from Cloud Foundry, Docker, and others. Our team gains insights on how to further enhance Stackato through conversations with IT operations and development communities, along with our global enterprise clients. We benefit from this dialogue and want to give back. One of our initiatives, the ActiveState Education Partner Program, equips colleges and universities with access to Stackato. Today's announcement: Free access to the Stackato 20GB Cluster in production is our most significant initiative to help support the breakdown of global accessibility barriers to technical innovation," said Bart Copeland, President and CEO, ActiveState.

"Ideas become identified as commercially viable through assessment and testing. Stackato 3.4 is breaking new ground by enabling free access to clustering up to 20GB RAM to test and leverage scalability, high availability, and load balancing, along with access to use the apps in production," said Jeff Hobbs, CTO and VP, engineering, ActiveState.


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