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Java Plumbr Unlocks Threads


Plumbr, a Java performance monitoring solution, has released a new Locked Thread Detection feature.

This is aimed at understanding of how to solve performance issues of different applications to prevent unsatisfactory end-user experience by automatically detecting the root cause of performance problems.

Cofounder and CEO of Plumbr, Priit Potter, says that Plumbr eliminates the need to manually detect the root cause of why the end-users can't buy items from (for example) an online shop or make money transfers, saving IT teams on average two weeks per performance problem.

"Faster and more stable service makes a big difference in e-commerce, because every lost second could mean a lost customer," Potter added.

According to Plumbr's survey, 16% of different Java-based applications (e.g. banks, online stores, and CRM-s) are suffering from locked threads.

The end-user experiences locked threads problem as slow performing applications or webpages. Locked threads and other performance issues get attention usually only after the end-user is affected — 82% of the cases, the issue at hand impacted end users in production.

"Compared to other Java performance-monitoring solutions, Plumbr is the only one that automatically detects the root causes of performance issues. It doesn't tell you that your Java app is running out of memory. It gives you the 10 lines of new code you need to copy-paste to your code base to make the issue go away. The new feature answers the requests of developers and IT operations engineers," said Potter.

Out of 500 Java applications that Plumbr studied, 80 applications were suffering from locked threads.

Locked Thread Detection is the third feature Plumbr has launched since it was founded in 2011. Plumbr also detects memory leaks and inefficient Garbage Collection behavior, locating the specific line of code or error in configuration that is causing the problem in your application and equips you with a step-by-step solution for the fix.


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