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Quova Expands Geolocation Developer Portal


First launched in November 2010, Geolocation data pioneer Quova has this week ramped up its developer portal with a new set of 'guidance features' for developers seeking additional help.

The Quova Developer Portal is described as a location for developers to gain free access to the Quova API to build their own geolocation-powered applications to the Web, desktop, and mobile devices.

The new featured solutions gallery is designed to allow developers to see what other people are building with the Quova API. It will also showcase modules and complete applications that have been developed to integrate the Quova IP-based API into a developer's environment.

The portal provides documentation and code samples for popular programming languages such as: PHP, Python, Java, Ruby, Perl, and C#. In addition to the standard XML format that Quova supports, the company is now also providing optional JSON formatted responses.

By tapping into the world of IP intelligence, Quova says that developers can integrate data from its portal into web applications to prevent fraud, comply with local regulations, target market messaging, and localize content. Programmers can also pull geographic location and network data for any Internet Protocol (IP) address in the public address space.

Quova's REST API provides a RESTful (REST) interface that returns data over HTTP. Information returned includes: area code and time zone, longitude and latitude, MSA (Metropolitan Statistical Area), network information, and the postal code, city, state, and region of any Internet Protocol (IP) address in the public domain.

"Geolocation data is a critical ingredient for web applications," said Jay Webster, chief product officer, Quova, Inc. "Determining the location of site visitors can help developers target their websites at the appropriate audiences, giving visitors more incentive to return. We're looking forward to partnering with developers on projects built with the Quova API, as we have most recently with Mobiah on the GeoPosty WordPress application."


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