Channels ▼
RSS

JVM Languages

Do You Burn From JavaScript Churn?


There's an old saying in marketing and public relations: When there's no news, do a survey, market report, or study. Despite this naysaying in the face of what is arguably over-used industry fluff and puff, ThoughtWorks would have us believe that its so-called "technology radar" tracker is still worth its salt.

The firm claims to have produced an "honest assessment of trends significantly impacting software development and business strategy" that developers should pay attention to.

Company CTO Dr. Rebecca Parsons and ThoughtWorks' technology advisory board member Neal Ford encourage companies to create their own radar, enabling (in theory) a more proactive approach to technology choices.

"Having a radar helps people think about which technologies they should investigate, when to be more or less aggressive about adoption, and allows for more intelligent decision making," said Ford.

The notable themes in this edition of Technology Radar include churn in the JavaScript world — JavaScript used to be a "condiment technology," says ThoughtWorks, and always used to augment other technologies. It has kept that role but expanded into its own platform with a staggering rate of change.

Also worth thinking about are microservices and the rise of the API. "We are seeing an incredible amount of interest in microservice architectures, as well as an emphasis on the importance of the API both within an organization and as a bridge to the outside world," said Parsons.

Also of note is Conway's Law — some companies are mired in siloed structures that add needless friction to engineering efforts, while more enlightened companies use team organization to drive the kinds of architectures they want. And finally, re-decentralization, where over 90% of the world's email moves through just 10 providers. Prompted in part by revelations about the U.S.'s stranglehold on Internet infrastructure, and a desire to maintain more individual and organizational control, ThoughtWorks sees a new trend in "re-decentralization" of both data and infrastructure.


Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 

Video