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Inside The Application Component Message Center


TIBCO details news of its Enterprise Message Service (EMS) version 8.0 release with added support for the new Java Message Service (JMS) 2.0 specification, which was finalized in May of 2013.

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This latest messaging standard allows application components based on Java Enterprise Edition to create, send, receive, and read messages.

This is the first update to the JMS specification in over a decade. It introduces a number of capabilities, including a simplified API as well as a number of new messaging features to allow applications to handle much higher message volumes.

JMS 2.0 introduces the ability to perform an asynchronous send, allowing applications to perform additional processing while the message is being sent to the server. This allows programmers to design applications that will be able to handle significantly higher volumes of transactions using the same infrastructure.

"To remain competitive in today's environment of ever-increasing data volumes, organizations must develop a strategy to scale and streamline IT systems to support business growth while reining in costs. EMS version 8.0 goes a long way to help organizations do just that," said Denny Page, chief engineer, TIBCO. "The new Central Administration capabilities simplify the management of large complex deployments, while support for JMS 2.0 with its simplified APIs, help reduce application development costs."

The new Central Administration for TIBCO Enterprise Message Service allows DevOps to configure and monitor all instances of EMS within their environment. Users can now make changes to multiple EMS server configurations and deploy those to all server instances automatically. The new monitoring views provide easy insight into key EMS server metrics from the same browser interface.

TIBCO Enterprise Message Service is described as a standards-based messaging solution that can serve as the backbone of a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) by providing JMS-compliant communications across a wide range of platforms and application technologies.


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