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Sprint, IBM Team Up for Mobile Dev Tools


Titan is the just released development platform for Sprint devices running Windows Mobile. Support for the Eclipse embedded Rich Client (eRCP) application model and IBM Lotus Expeditor includes APIs for access to Sprint-specific phone features. We recently chatted with Mark Rogalski, IBM's lead software architect on the Sprint Titan project.


DDJ: Mark, what it "Sprint Titan"?

MR: Titan is Sprint's new mobile application platform.

DDJ: What kind of applications can we expect to see?

MR: Sprint is initially targeting business applications -- workforce automation solutions.

DDJ: Can you tell us about the development environment?

MR: For both Sprint Titan and IBM's Lotus Expeditor, Java-based application development is done using the Eclipse IDE with Java Development Tools (JDT) and/or Web Tools Platform (WTP) installed. The Titan and Expeditor toolkits both contain target platforms that reflect the function available in the device runtime. The Eclipse tooling lets developers utilize their current desktop development knowledge and skills to develop for devices. In addition, existing Eclipse projects and code may be easily adapted for execution in mobile applications.

DDJ: Where do Web 2.0 and mashups come into play?

MR: There are several aspects to this answer. Primarily, the OMRi service framework employed by Titan and Expeditor allows applications to share services, code, and easily communicate with each other. The Eclipse extension point framework provides a mechanism by which applications can advertise ways that they can be extended and lets other applications provide those extensions. This enables a truly collaborative mash-up environment. Finally, the GUI Browser widget which can be variously used in applications allows web content to be integrated in ways previously unavailable on mobile phones. For instance, interactive map images from the web could be integrated into a phone's contact list.

DDJ: Is there a web site that readers can go to for more information?

MR: Sure. More information and a free evaluation copy of the software is available at the Sprint Titan page.


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