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UmbrellaSDK: "Completely" Cloud-Based IDE For Mobile


Simulation technology specialist Zimusoft has released UmbrellaSDK, a new cloud-based integrated development environment (IDE) for iOS and Android application development. Staking a claim for recognition as the first cross-platform mobile development tool that runs entirely in the browser, developers will not need to download or install any data or code to use this new tool.

Using the "everything under one umbrella" tagline, from its cloud-based home this new tool provides a code window, assets for application construction, and on-screen simulators to help tune use case scenarios post deployment.

Zimusoft says that UmbrellaSDK makes it possible to code and deploy apps to an iOS or Android device instantly with no provisioning required. The code editor and all the mobile simulators (for iPhone, iPad, and Android) are included. Developers are urged to try the product and use their browsers to type code, run it in the onscreen mobile device of their choice, and then publish it to the App Store or Android Market.

The company says that UmbrellaSDK provides a complete desktop including code window, file explorer window, and a log window to see errors and debug text output — there is also a "preview window" to view assets. All this is made possible by use of HTML5 and JavaScript.

According to Zimusoft, "The common ground for all the new mobile devices is WebKit. JavaScript has grown up to become a full-fledged powerful and expressive language. First-time coders and pros alike will feel at home writing code using our API. One simple function will put an image anywhere you want it. Add Text. Add Lists and Button — and we have provided all the cross platform logic to make it work — everywhere."

Zimusoft goes to great pains to point out that this is not one of those "cryptic JavaScript libraries", designed to be a crutch for HTML. This is new code designed to simplify everything so developers can focus on what they want their app to do.


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