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Amazon AppStream Now Available


Amazon AppStream is now available to all developers after its initial preview at fall's re:Invent conference.

AppStream technology represents a low-latency service to stream "resource intensive" applications and games from the Amazon cloud. AppStream deploys and renders an application on AWS infrastructure and streams the output to computers, tablets, and smartphones.

Developers are invited to use AppStream to build complex applications that run on "simple devices" that are "unconstrained" by the compute power, storage, or graphical rendering capabilities of the device.

Amazon AppStream includes an SDK that currently supports streaming applications from Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 to devices running FireOS, Android, iOS, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

An application can take advantage of the g2instance type including high-performance GPU-powered rendering of 2D and 3D graphics.

Amazon offers a variety of instance types such as compute-optimized, memory-optimized, and so on, and the G2 instance falls into the GPU-optimized family that enjoys popular use cases in game streaming, 3D application streaming, and other server-side graphics workloads.

With AppStream, an application runs in a Windows 2008 R2 environment on an EC2 instance. It can make use of native Windows APIs and AWS resources such as relational (Amazon RDS) and NoSQL (Amazon DynamoDB) databases, persistent object storage (Amazon S3), caching (Amazon ElastiCache), message queues (Amazon SQS), publish and subscribe messaging (Amazon SNS), and email delivery (Amazon SES).

"Your client code runs on a desktop (Windows or Mac) or a mobile device running FireOS, Android, or iOS. The client code calls AppStream to obtain an Entitlement URL through an Entitlement Service (we supply a sample that you can use as-is, customize, or use as the basis for your own implementation). The client opens the Entitlement URL to initiate the streaming of video and audio content for playback. The client is also responsible for routing keyboard, mouse, and other device events to the application for processing," said Jeff Barr, chief evangelist for the Amazon Web Services.


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