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JRapid Launches Rapid Development Java Platform



This week's Oracle OpenWorld and JavaOne exhibition has seen Oracle make some admirable announcements with regard to the Java roadmap. But as a whole, Java has been arguably somewhat overshadowed by Larry Ellison's gung-ho America's Cup winning bravado and general presence. Unperturbed by the big man's keynote hogging antics earlier this week, one or two smaller Java purists have managed to highlight their developments and new product announcements.

Among the Java cognoscenti making waves this week is JRapid, a neat little development team with offices in California and Buenos Airies. The company used this week's conference to launch version 1.0 beta of its rapid development cloud platform for Java developers.

Claiming to offer a route to creating cloud-ready, enterprise applications up to five times faster than on conventional platforms, JRapid can be used either online through its web-based designer or through Eclipse using the JRapid plug-in for Eclipse -- thus enabling developers to keep their desktop synchronized with the cloud.

According to the company's development team, the secret sauce behind JRapid is its code generator which automatically generates all the layers of the application.

"JRapid allows Java developers to build enterprise applications with forms, listings, reports and charts. What makes JRapid different from other products is that it lets developers create powerful applications -- not just the usual CRUDs -- with an impressive user interface, lots of add-ons, automatically generated business intelligence functionality and everything necessary to run in the cloud with just one click," said Matias Bagini, founder and CEO of JRapid Corp.

Applications built with JRapid use the traditional Java web stack -- HTML, Ajax, RESTful Web Services, POJOs, Hibernate, MySQL/Oracle/PostgreSQL/etc -- and run on any standard Java application server. Developers can deploy applications built with JRapid on their own servers or use JRapid cloud servers running on Amazon Web Services.


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