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Syncfusion Puts Client-Side Controls In Control


Syncfusion has announced the release of a suite of client-side controls targeting line-of-business needs under the name Essential Studio for JavaScript.

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This collection of 30 JavaScript controls is intended to serve what its makers call “an overlooked segment" of web developers; i.e., those who want client-side components that rise to meet the requirements of enterprise apps.

Syncfusion explains that its controls work with a number of major enterprise .NET applications to keep enterprise developers on the safe side of web programming, such as the server, where performance is predictable and proper rendering is assured.

With the introduction of JavaScript controls, Syncfusion now effectively makes the entirety of its business experience available to all web developers with a set enterprise controls in one place; they'll no longer have half-and-half models where a combination of client controls wrestle with server controls.

"Most JavaScript suites existing today weren't built with enterprise applications in mind," according to Syncfusion Vice President Daniel Jebaraj. "With recent advancements on the client side, grids render faster, controls are more interactive, and data visualizations, such as charts, can go places never thought possible."

Essential Studio for JavaScript provides an API suitable for enterprise applications and includes, among its 30 components, an OLAP-based grid control, a fast-rendering chart control for articulating data, a grid control built and ready for business (featuring grouping support), and a variety of gauge controls for both basic and complex dashboards.

"Developers who incorporate more interactivity into their apps will be able to provide instant guidance to the end user, locate content faster, and succinctly convey information," says Manoj Gopinath, Syncfusion user experience manager. "Those who create apps like that will be rewarded."


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