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Are Painful Web Tools Going Mobile?


Newly launched this week is the Perfecto Mobile MobileCloud Developer Toolkit to provide mobile app developers with test automation and collaboration capabilities for Agile.

Perfecto is selling its "custom designed for mobile" wares here based upon an assertion that today, many mobile developers are working around limitations with tools originally designed for interacting and testing web apps.

Developers will find support for "familiar open source tools" here including Eclipse, Selenium, and Jenkins.

"Mobile is agile by nature and thus forces developers to simultaneously contend with faster release cycles and an ever-changing mobile device feature set. Testing on real devices in real-life conditions earlier in the development process is key to delivering higher quality applications," said Yoram Mizrachi, CTO, Perfecto Mobile.

Perfecto says that developers will be able to extend the environment, tools, and languages they know into mobile — and then embed real devices connected to real carriers throughout the development process.

MobileCloud for Eclipse is an Eclipse add-on that delivers support for automated mobile application testing using real devices from within the Eclipse UI. The add-on provides record, playback, and debugging abilities, full object support regardless of application style, complete device under test data including logs, vitals, and step-by-step execution reporting.

Also here is the MobileCloud WebDriver (Selenium) — the first mobile-ready Selenium-based testing solution moving beyond browser-only applications to native and hybrid mobile applications on real cloud-based devices. MobileCloud Jenkins Plugin also automates build acceptance testing as part of each build and supports continuous integration.

The MobileCloud plugin enables broader testing on real cloud-based devices resulting in earlier defect identification. Adding real device testing to the Jenkins nightly build can be accomplished in minutes and testing results are delivered automatically.


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