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Cross-Stack Customizable Clouds, Nicely Monitored


New Relic has arranged a marriage between its cloud application performance management technology and OpenLogic's CloudSwing open Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) solution. The companies have subsequently extended invites to developers to deploy applications into the cloud using CloudSwing for the normal cost, but now with New Relic Standard edition at no charge.

OpenLogic's CloudSwing core functions include cost-tracking and options to customize technology stacks with alternative infrastructures and languages as developers work to build them. OpenLogic says that CloudSwing's USP is its ability to help manage its cloud costs across multiple clouds. This factor, plus the groundswell of interest being shown in hybrid cloud environments mixed with private cloud data centers (for more sensitive information storage), could put this technology on more web/cloud developer's radar.

Based on open source technologies, CloudSwing is platform-agnostic and frees enterprises from the limitations of vendor lock-in associated with proprietary tools. New Relic is now fully integrated with OpenLogic CloudSwing. New and existing CloudSwing customers will have their New Relic account provisioned automatically.

"Offering New Relic Standard free of charge for complete application monitoring allows CloudSwing to go beyond the server- or instance-level monitoring offered by most cloud providers," said Rod Cope, CTO at OpenLogic. "New Relic provides all of the key metrics that our CloudSwing customers need to monitor and manage their cloud applications."

"New Relic and OpenLogic share the same goal of enabling organizations to rapidly deploy and scale their applications," said Bill Lapcevic, New Relic's vice-president of business development. "We know that in order to do this organizations need the right management and monitoring tools. New Relic provides the 360-degree view of application performance that basic monitoring from cloud infrastructure providers don't provide."


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