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Free APItools Traffic Tool


3scale has announced APItools On-Premise. The firm's API management platform now features this free and open source service to track all of an application's API traffic. It also includes the abilities to transform and modify inbound and outbound traffic, and analyze flows to detect peaks and problems.

Designed for high-traffic API consumption, APItools On-Premise provides integration flexibility with existing API testing and monitoring systems. Its makers call it the "perfect tool to manage external dependencies on APIs" for developers.

While the previous version of APItools was only available as a cloud-hosted solution, the new one allows developers to combine cloud monitors with on-premise and integrate monitoring into API traffic.

The APItools dashboard offers overall insights and key indicators of all internal and external API services used. Different API traffic monitors can be created for different apps and for different development environments, and can be shared by multiple team members.

On an MIT license, the company hopes that when code is executed and manipulated, individual setups will be contributed back to the community.

"Today's web and mobile applications depend on a wide range of backend APIs to make them function," said Steven Willmott, CEO of 3scale. "But staying in control of these external systems is a huge pain point for developers. As the Internet of Things and the API market continues to evolve, developers will face increasing challenges in integrating new APIs and new devices becoming available."

"We use APItools primarily for troubleshooting during development and internal releases of the app," said Javier Soto, iOS platform lead at Pebble. "APItools has already saved us a lot of time since we integrated it with our APIs a couple of months ago. Recently, we also integrated it in our internal iOS releases to verify that the network requests that we send to HockeyApp work and that crash reporting is functioning correctly."


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