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Google's Chrome Web Store Now Open For Developers


Unconfirmed reports suggest that Google's Chrome Web Store will be formally launched this October. For now, developers can at least be certain that the company has confirmed the Web Store is open for testing. Google used its official blog to show web application developers what their applications will look like on the store and get a feel for how monetization tools will work.

The search giant has also confirmed that it will take a five percent slice of the developer's go-to-market price to host the application and process payment transactions from customers. There will also be a 30-cent fee per transaction and a one-time $5 registration fee unless a programmer already happens to be a registered Chrome Extensions developer.

According to Google's Chromium blog, "When the Chrome Web Store launches, it will replace the current gallery, featuring a completely new design for users to discover great apps, extensions, and themes all in one place. Until then, only you can see the apps you upload — they will not be visible to other visitors of the gallery during this developer preview. In the meantime, you can continue to use the gallery for publishing Chrome extensions and making them available to Chrome users."

Web application developers have the option to decide whether to offer their software as a paid download with a minimum price of $1.99, or as a free of charge trial version.

Google's developer video describing the Chrome Web Store in more detail is available here.


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