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Jolt Awards: Mobile Development Tools

, March 04, 2014 The best tools for the nuts-and-bolts of building mobile apps.
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Jolt Productivity Award: Titanium Studio

If you have experience with Eclipse, JavaScript, XML, CSS, and the Model-View-Controller (MVC) Web frameworks, Titanium Studio allows you to easily take advantage of your existing skills to develop mobile applications for different platforms from a single code base.

You can target mobile Web, Android, Blackberry, iOS and Tizen. (Windows Phone and Windows 8 aren't included as target platforms at present.) The project structure makes it easy for you to organize the assets that are specific to each different target platform. Titanium Studio provides seamless integration between its Alloy MVC framework and the Eclipse-based IDE, with good support for the mobile development lifecycle.

Alloy has an interesting focus on code-reuse through the use of Alloy widgets, which allow you to create components and reuse them across multiple apps. The Alloy MVC framework is built on Node.js with support for both Backbone.js and Underscore.js; therefore, any previous experience with these popular JavaScript platforms will reduce the learning curve for Alloy.

As with any other MVC framework, Alloy enables the separation of the user interface, business logic, and data model for the apps. The ability to run and debug your mobile apps in a browser before you deploy to your mobile devices increases your productivity, especially with apps that are data-oriented and don't require much interaction with the device's specific features.

If you have to develop data-oriented or cloud-oriented mobile apps that don't need to take full advantage of the specific capabilities of each platform, Titanium Studio provides all the necessary tools to be productive when creating these kinds of mobile apps with JavaScript as the main language.






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