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Jonathan Erickson

Dr. Dobb's Bloggers

Ruby On the Rise; Symbian OS Version Released

October 21, 2008

According to a recent study by Black Duck Software's Koders.com, popularity of the Ruby programming language is on the upswing. From what Koders.com reports, Ruby is now the fourth most requested language on Koders.com, after Java, C/C+, and C#. Additionarlly, the number of Ruby searches has increased by more than 20 times since 2004 and has surpassed alternatives, such as PHP, Python, and Perl.

Moreover, Ruby, used in combination with the Rails framework, seems to be gaining momentum and will reach 4 million developers worldwide by 2013, says Gartner's Mark Driver. "Moreover, Ruby will enjoy a higher concentration among corporate IT developers than typical, dynamic 'scripting' languages, such as PHP," says Driver.

"Black Duck's search data confirms the tremendous growth that we are seeing within the community of Ruby developers," said Tom Copeland, system administrator of RubyForge.org. "It's great to see a leading code search site like Koders.com index RubyForge because it represents another way to make the projects in our community available to tens of thousands of developers worldwide."

Adding fuel to the Ruby fire, Symbian Research has released Ruby for Symbian OS  via the Symbian Developer Network .  In doing so, Symbian Research has been extended the initial port of Ruby 1.9 which was carried out under the auspices of the GREDIA project  ("Grid-enabled access to Rich mEDIA content")  by Pragmaticomm. Specifics regarding the license are available here.

The downloads include the Ruby 1.9 binaries, with release notes and basic instructions, and a read-only source-code repository for this release can be found on the Pragmaticomm's source server. This repository also contains the earlier version of the Ruby 1.9 VM for Symbian OS, developed for use in the GREDIA project; Symbian Research release above has augmented the earlier GREDIA version with:

  • A new launcher
  • Extensions that enable to use of camera and video functionality for Ruby programmers
  • A prototype implementation for adding dynamic extensions to Ruby

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