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This Week's Developer Reading List


Crafting Rails Applications: Expert Practices for Everyday Rails Development
by Jose Valim
With Rails 3, you can now easily extend the framework, change its behavior, and replace whole components to bend it to your will, all without messy hacks. The Pragmatic Programmers imprint touts this "beta" book as the first resource that deep-dives into the new Rails 3 APIs and shows you how use them to write better web applications and make your day-to-day work with Rails more productive.
http://is.gd/o7EFDp

GPU Computing Gems Emerald Edition
Edited by Wen-mei W. Hwu
If you follow parallel/GPU computing, you might be interested in this first volume of a new Applications of GPU Computing Series. NVIDIA worked with publisher Morgan Kaufmann to develop the series, which provides practical techniques and real-world examples straight from the leading minds in GPU-based research, demonstrating how new parallel computing techniques are enabling scientific breakthroughs.
http://is.gd/Q9xvBl

Software Testing with Visual Studio 2010
by Jeff Levinson
In this book, Microsoft MVP and VS testing guru Jeff Levinson shows exactly how to use Microsoft’s new tools to save time, reduce costs, and improve quality throughout the entire development lifecycle. Topics covered include first-rate functional testing; creating and executing tests and recording the results with log files and video; and creating bugs directly from tests, ensuring reproducibility and eliminating wasted time.
http://is.gd/H5hRVJ

Mastering XPages: A Step-by-Step Guide to XPages Application Development and the XSP Language
by Martin Donnelly, Mark Wallace, and Tony McGuckin
This book is written as a definitive programmer's guide highlighting best practices from IBM's own XPages developers. The authors start from the very beginning, helping developers steadily build expertise through practical code examples and clear, complete explanations. Readers will work through scores of real-world XPages examples, learning XPages and XSP language skills, and gaining deep insight into the entire development process.
http://is.gd/fzcust


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