Channels ▼
RSS

Open Source

Zend, Microsoft: Interoperability for the Identity Metasystem


Microsoft and Zend Technologies have announced a collaboration to enable support for information cards by PHP developers through a component built for Zend Framework. Using this as a stand-alone component or as part of the Framework, PHP developers will be able to specify a Web site's security policy and accept information cards from trusted third parties.

"Microsoft and Zend are making a commitment to deliver information card support to PHP developers, which will reduce development costs and help make the Web safer and more secure for people," said Vijay Rajagopalan, principal architect for Platform & Interoperability Strategy at Microsoft.

The cooperative work on information cards extends Microsoft's previous interoperability efforts in this area. Microsoft, in collaboration with Fraunhofer Institute FOKUS and ThoughtWorks, has developed open source interoperability projects on information cards for systems based on Java and Ruby.

>[?"Web sites developed on ASP.NET can already accept information cards," Rajagopalan explained. "With this work, a Java-based Web site, for example, built on the Sun Java System Web Server, Apache Tomcat or IBM WebSphere Application Server can now accept a digital information card for security-enhanced identity. A Web site built on Ruby on Rails can accept an information card. There is also an open source information card library project implemented in C, developed by Ping Identity Corp."

Information about Microsoft open source interoperability identity card projects can be found at:

When support for information cards within the Zend Framework (an open source PHP application framework for developing Web applications and Web services) is enabled, users who access PHP-enabled Web sites will receive consistent user control of their digital identities and improved confidence in the authentication process for remote applications, all with greater security than password-based Web logins offer. Zend Technologies' implementation of information cards lets users provide their digital identities in a familiar, security-enhanced way. They are analogous to business cards, credit cards or membership cards that people use every day.


Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.