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Georgia Tech Planning Manycore Computing Research Center



Georgia Institute of Technology has announced plans for the creation of the Georgia Tech Center for Manycore Computing, a research center for innovations in computer architecture. A collaborative effort between the Georgia Tech Colleges of Computing and Engineering, the Center for Manycore Computing (CMC) will address deep, foundational challenges in programming, design and systems development to overcome power and architecture barriers to the progression of computer performance.

"Our mission at the Center for Manycore Computing is to establish a research agenda that looks well-beyond the short-term and develops innovative and applicable solutions to future limitations on computing progress," said Tom Conte, professor and director of the planned Georgia Tech Center for Manycore Computing. "By projecting out decades, we can better ensure sustained growth in the power, speed and capabilities of technologies that drive worldwide social and economic growth."

Manycore computing will enable computing functions that are impossible today. For example, in the emerging field of mobile robotics, manycore computing would allow exponentially enhanced functionality of the robot, leading to its ability to better assess, react to and manipulate its surroundings. Other prime areas for manycore application include embedded computing, data search and analysis, and gaming/multimedia, among others.

As part of its mission, the CMC will also look at new ways to incorporate parallel programming and advanced architectures into its core undergraduate computing classes. By teaching today's students to "think in parallel" at an earlier age, tomorrow's leaders will be better able to develop the advancements needed to maintain the exponential growth rate for computing performance for decades to come.


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