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IBM Launches 'Institute for Advanced Security'



IBM has launched the IBM Institute for Advanced Security, a program intended to help government and private sector clients, academics, and business partners address and mitigate the issues associated with securing cyberspace. Based in Washington, D.C., the Institute will provide a collaborative setting for public and private sector officials to tap IBM's security expertise so they can more efficiently and effectively secure and protect critical systems and information threatened by increasingly malicious and costly cyber threats.

IBM experts from across the company will come together within the Institute to help clients address existing and emerging cybersecurity challenges by using analytics and other advanced technologies, services and solutions to anticipate, prevent and mitigate the growing risk and potential economic impact of cyber attacks.

"There is no lack of security products and services available today, but adding security after a system is developed or implemented seldom works. Moreover, today's rapidly-evolving threats make such 'bolt-on' approaches even less effective at a time when clients are wary of not realizing a return from their security investments," said Charles Palmer, director of the Institute for Advanced Security and chief technologist of Cybersecurity and Privacy for IBM Research. "IBM will engage with government clients and other constituents to help them comprehensively understand how to develop and integrate effective security protections into the fabric of their critical systems and services."

The Institute also will support IBM's existing work with government and private sector leaders, and serve as a focal point for new clients, policymakers, and other key constituencies to access and collaborate with the company's cybersecurity experts and resources in the U.S. and around the world.


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