Channels ▼
RSS

Parallel

IBM: Now Is The Time For KVM


IBM says that now is great time for KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) technology as a result of key contributions from its large developer community.

The KVM hypervisor is an open source virtualization technology and, increasingly, it is becoming an important tool in any Linux user's handbook, especially in light of OpenStack.

KVM is a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions (Intel VT or AMD-V) and consisting of a loadable kernel module (kvm.ko) that provides the core virtualization infrastructure and a processor-specific module (kvm-intel.ko) or (kvm-amd.ko).

IBM says that hypervisors have had to better manage compute, network, and storage resources — and that this need that has been fulfilled by KVM.

The "potential" of KVM for enterprises is incredibly valuable far beyond its origins — just like Linux — asserts Jim Wasko in his role as director of IBM's Linux Technology Center.

"After a year of contributing patches to the KVM community, IBM is announcing that a Power Systems version of KVM, PowerKVM, will be available on IBM's next-generation Power Systems servers tuned for Linux before the end of the quarter," he said.

There are two reasons why IBM created a KVM product to exploit the Power Systems architecture — beyond its increasing deployment in the open source environment.

First, says Wasko, Linux users wanted a "familiar" look-and-feel for virtualization; and second, cloud solutions demand KVM's flexibility, performance, and OpenStack integration.

"We also recognize that for those who prefer to work in a pure Linux environment, working with KVM is highly desirable. Just like Linux, KVM for Power exploits the underlying hardware including multi-threading, large memory support, and a range of I/O. It also comes with Kimchi — a graphical open-source tool for easy virtualization management of simple configurations. Larger configurations such as clouds can be managed with OpenStack-based tools."


Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 

Video