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This Week's Multicore Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb's to keep you up-to-date on parallel programming and multicore technology.

Research in Mobile Intelligence
by Laurence T. Yang
New from the Wiley Series on Parallel and Distributed Computing, this book explores the combination of mobile computing and computational intelligence. As a very new area of research, mobile intelligence has created a wide range of opportunities for researchers, engineers, and developers to create new applications for both end users and businesses. Mobile Intelligence covers the comprehensive state-of-the-art in various applications of computational intelligence to the mobile paradigm, including mobile data intelligence, mobile mining, mobile intelligence security, mobile agent, location-based mobile information services, mobile context-aware and applications, intelligent networks, and mobile multimedia. Readers will not only learn different areas of mobile computing and its issues but also various intelligent approaches that contribute in addressing these issues, as well as discover other potential elements in the mobile paradigm.
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-047019555X.html

Introduction to Reconfigurable Supercomputing
by Marco Lanzagorta, Stephen Bique, and Robert Rosenberg
This book covers technologies, applications, tools, languages, procedures, advantages, and disadvantages of reconfigurable supercomputing using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The target audience is the community of users of High Performance Computers (HPC) who may benefit from porting their applications into a reconfigurable environment. As such, this book is intended to guide the HPC user through the many algorithmic considerations, hardware alternatives, usability issues, programming languages, and design tools that need to be understood before embarking on the creation of reconfigurable parallel codes. We hope to show that FPGA acceleration, based on the exploitation of the data parallelism, pipelining and concurrency remains promising in view of the diminishing improvements in traditional processor and system design.
http://www.morganclaypool.com/doi/abs/10.2200/S00238ED1V01Y200911CAC009


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