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This Week's Developer Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb’s to keep you up-to-date on software development tools and techniques.

Understanding SCA (Service Component Architecture)
By Jim Marino and Michael Rowley
Service Component Architecture (SCA) is a new programming model that enables developers to build distributed applications more efficiently and effectively than previous technologies. In this book, two leading experts offer the first complete and independent guide to SCA. Drawing on extensive experience both developing the SCA standards and implementing large-scale SCA applications, Jim Marino and Michael Rowley provide an insider's perspective for developers and technical managers tasked with architecting and implementing enterprise systems. Understanding SCA (Service Component Architecture) provides the background necessary to make informed decisions about when and how to best use SCA to build enterprise applications.
http://www.informit.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=0321515080

Murach's ADO.NET 3.5, LINQ, 
and the Entity Framework with C# 2008
by Anne Boehm
This book shows you how to use Visual Studio 2008 and ADO.NET 3.5 to develop database applications. That includes the full gamut of skills you need, from using prototyping features that generate ADO.NET code...to writing your own ADO.NET code from scratch so you can closely control how the database processing works...to using .NET 3.5 features like LINQ and the ADO.NET Entity Framework that actually change the way you think about handling data.
http://www.murach.com/books/dcs8/index.htm

Modular Java
By Craig Walls
This pragmatic guide introduces you to OSGi and Spring Dynamic Modules, two of the most compelling frameworks for Java modularization. Driven by real-world examples, this book will equip you with the know-how you need to develop Java applications that are composed of smaller, loosely coupled, highly cohesive modules.
http://oreilly.com/catalog/9781934356401/?utm_content=PR+-+Modular+Java+--+Prag+Prog&utm_campaign=PR&utm_source=iPost&utm_medium=email


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