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This Week's Developer Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb’s to keep you up-to-date on software development tools and techniques.

Pomodoro Technique Illustrated:
The Easy Way to Do More in Less Time

by Staffan Noteberg
Do you ever look at the clock and wonder where the day went? You spent all this time at work and didn’t come close to getting everything done. Tomorrow, try something new. Use the Pomodoro Technique, originally developed by Francesco Cirillo, to work in focused sprints throughout the day. In this book, Staffan Noteberg shows you how to organize your work to accomplish more in less time. There’s no need for expensive software or fancy planners. You can get started with nothing more than a piece of paper, a pencil, and a kitchen timer.
http://www.pragprog.com/titles/snfocus/pomodoro-technique-illustrated

User Experience Re-Mastered
edited by Chauncey Wilson
Good user interface design isn’t just about aesthetics or using the latest technology. Designers also need to ensure their product is offering an optimal user experience. This requires user needs analysis, usability testing, persona creation, prototyping, design sketching, and evaluation through-out the design and development process. This book takes material from Morgan Kaufmann’s Series in Interactive Technologies and presents it in typical project framework. Chauncey Wilson guides the reader through each chapter, introducing each stage, explaining its context, and emphasizing its significance in the user experience lifecycle.
http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookdescription.cws_home/720164/description#description

Murach's C++ 2008
by Prentiss Knowlton
Learn C++ as quickly and easily as possible. This book is concise and practical, and takes advantage of the Visual Studio 2008 IDE to teach you all the language features you'll use most in Windows applications, then serves as a handy C++ reference that you can use every day.
http://www.murach.com/books/pls8/index.htm


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