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2010 IT Project Success Rates


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The results from the 2010 IT Project Success Survey, including the source data, questions, and a summary slide deck are available for download free of charge.

The results from the 2010 Agile Project Success Survey, including the source data, questions, and a summary slide deck, are available for download free of charge.

The results from the IT Project Success Rates by Team Size and Paradigm: July 2010 State of the IT Union Survey, including the source data, questions, and a summary slide deck are available for download free of charge.

The current version of the Chaos Report is available from the Standish Group.

In the January/February 2010 issue of IEEE Software Laurenz Eveleens and Chris Verhoef published their article The Rise and Fall of the Chaos Report Figures which summarizes their research into IT project success rates.

Samad Aidane wrote The "Chaos Report" Myth Busters, where he interviews Laurenz Eveleens and Chris Verhoef about their examination of the Chaos Report.

In Software Development Success Rates I describe results from the 2008 IT Project Success Rates Survey which found that the more distributed an IT team was the lower the success rate regardless of development paradigm. It also found that agile and iterative teams outperformed both traditional/classical teams and ad-hoc teams.

You can follow Scott W. Ambler on Twitter.

My paper Introduction to the Agile Scaling Model summarizes the ASM framework which provides advice for scaling agile strategies to meet the unique needs of your project.

Surveys Exploring the Current State of Information Technology Practices links to the results of all the Dr. Dobb's surveys which I've run over the years.

In Surveying the Agile Community I provide advice for how to design surveys, where to get feedback from other survey designers, and some of the problems associated with survey-based research results.

My Agility@Scale blog discusses strategies for adopting and applying agile strategies in the complex environments.


Scott W. Ambler is Chief Methodologist for Agile and Lean for IBM Rational


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