Channels ▼
RSS

Tools

BibPort: Creating Bibliographic References

Source Code Accompanies This Article. Download It Now.


Implementing BibPort with VSTO

Microsoft's VSTO provides a framework that can host plug-ins written in .NET languages within Office programs. The application and its open documents are represented as objects within a VSTO plug-in. This collection of VSTO objects permits manipulation of the program, as well as navigation of the underlying contents of documents in a structured manner. These objects are available for all supported file types used by Office programs in addition to those supported by after-market file conversion filters. VSTO represents an important abstraction that offers a means of processing many documents quickly and easily. To provide access to Word and its documents, VSTO provides a set of objects conforming to the WOM. With this set of objects, you can inspect the contents of a document in a detailed way.

User Interface Elements

BibPort has been ported through three iterations of Visual Studio, beginning with Word 2003 and the first version of VSTO. Although some changes have been made through the first two revisions, the BibPort code base has remained relatively unchanged between Visual Studio 2003 and 2005. The first two versions targeted Word 2003, which used traditional menu-driven systems. Presenting BibPort to users involved inserting a new menu specifically for BibPort functionality. This insertion was accomplished via several lines of code that registered the menu and created the hooks into BibPort at Word startup.

With Word 2007, ribbons replaced toolbars, requiring some change in the creation of these UI elements. Visual Studio 2008 includes a Ribbon Designer that assists in the creation of new ribbons and extensions. Figure 6 demonstrates the evolution from creating menus programmatically to creating ribbons through a wizard. This capability brings menu creation to the same level of point-and-click design that is common in Windows Forms in Visual Studio.

[Click image to view at full size]

Figure 6: Creating design elements in Word 2003 (left) and Word 2007 (right).


Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 

Video