Channels ▼
RSS

Tools

Keyloggers Evade Anti-Spyware


Keyloggers are designed to silently record all of one's computer activity. They are commonly used for parents to monitor their children's computer activity. Now they are being used for criminal activity ranging from spying on individuals, to identity theft and data theft.

The security team at SpyReveal tested the leading anti-spyware and anti-virus software against ten of the most popular keyloggers. The results indicated that most of the leading security software used to combat viruses and spyware failed to detect 70% of the keyloggers. While most failed to detect any keyloggers at all, SpyReveal software successfully detected all keyloggers.

A free whitepaper discussing the test and results is available from SpyReveal (registration required).

"More and more news stories are being published of hackers who have obtained credit card records by using keyloggers," said Mr. Hankinson, SpyReveal's co-founder. "Yet, we still see major players in the security industry continue to fail at this specific type of problem."

Still don't think you or your business is at risk? Take for example Verizon's 2009 Data Breach Investigations Supplemental Report, which states, "Keyloggers and spyware...played a crucial role in larger breach scenarios in which hundreds of millions of records were compromised."

"Consumers and businesses should not rely on a single solution for security. Each has a specific purpose. We want consumers to realize that even though their anti-spyware software says 'Nothing Found,' that any keylogger could still be present, recording credit card information or business intellectual property," Mr. Hankinson added.


Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 

Video