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Nvidia Bioinformatics Analyzes Plants, E. coli, and Giant Pandas


Nvidia is upbeat concerning news that the world's largest genomics institute is launching a cloud-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) bioinformatics research service accelerated by Nvidia GPUs.

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China-based BGI has combined automated pipeline analysis with software and tools to be integrated with the industry's largest sequencing platform. The intention is to provide information for biologists, bioinformaticists, and physicians to submit and receive an automated analysis of DNA sequencing data.

BGI carries out groundbreaking work in genomic sequencing of a wide range of life forms — ranging from plants and E. coli to the giant panda — to develop medicines, improve healthcare, and develop genetically enhanced food.

NOTE: Website bioplanet.com defines bioinformatics as follows: the application of computer technology to the management of biological information so that computers are used to gather, store, analyze, and integrate biological and genetic information which can then be applied to gene-based drug discovery and development — the need for bioinformatics capabilities has been precipitated by the explosion of publicly available genomic information resulting from the Human Genome Project.

Nvidia says that analysis of DNA big data will be massively sped up for genomics research and that this EasyGenomics cloud service features hybrid computing systems powered by Nvidia Tesla M2070 and M2075 GPUs, which accelerate the DNA sequencing data analysis in conjunction with system CPUs.

"By enabling larger numbers of researchers to accelerate DNA sequencing data more easily and affordably, we hope to help facilitate the use of genomics for clinical diagnostics as a practical component of health care, as well as for complex disease research," said Dr. Lin Fang, vice president at BGI.

"GPU acceleration enables scientists to analyze DNA sequencing data faster than was ever possible, reducing the time from five days to just five hours. Once fully deployed in the cloud, we anticipate EasyGenomics could one day revolutionize genomics research."


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