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This Week's Multicore Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb's to keep you up-to-date on parallel programming and multicore technology.

Parallel Computing: From Multicores and GPU's to Petascale
Edited by Barbara Chapman, Frederic Desprez, Gerhard R. Joubert, Alain Lichnewsky, Frans Peters, and Thierry Priol
Parallel computing technologies have brought dramatic changes to mainstream computing; the majority of todays PC's, laptops, and even notebooks incorporate multiprocessor chips with up to four processors. Standard components are increasingly combined with GPU's originally designed for high-speed graphics processing, and FPGA's to build parallel computers with a wide spectrum of high-speed processing functions. The scale of this powerful hardware is limited only by factors such as energy consumption and thermal control. However, in addition to hardware factors, the practical use of petascale and exascale machines is often hampered by the difficulty of developing software which will run effectively and efficiently on such architecture. This book includes selected and refereed papers, presented at the 2009 international Parallel Computing conference (ParCo2009), which set out to address these problems. It provides a snapshot of the state-of-the-art of parallel computing technologies in hardware, application, and software development.
http://www.booksonline.iospress.nl/Content/View.aspx?piid=16532

Algorithms and Architectures for Parallel Processing:
10th International Conference, ICA3PP 2010, Busan, Korea, May 21-23, 2010. Proceedings, Part I

Edited by Sang-Soo Yeo, Jong Hyuk Park, Laurence Tianruo Yang, and Ching-Hsien Hsu
This book constitutes the proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Algorithms and Architectures for Parallel Processing, ICA3PP. The 47 papers were carefully selected from 157 submissions and focus on topics for researchers and industry practioners to exchange information regarding advancements in the state of art and practice of IT-driven services and applications, as well as to identify emerging research topics and define the future directions of parallel processing.
http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/ww5j51jt077g/?p=9b0d353545bd452895f668bf405e0e52&pi=0


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