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Brightcove Launches Free HTML5 Mobile App Platform


Brightcove has released its App Cloud web application management platform to provide programmers with a means of wrapping their application into a more managed space from both a functionality and onward monetization perspective. Featuring an open source HTML5 mobile app development SDK and an accompanying set of cloud services for "operating and managing" apps, there are also developer tools for on-device testing as well as real-time analytics for tracking app installations and usage.

The platform itself essentially works to use HTML5 and JavaScript to develop native apps for Apple iOS and Google Android smartphones and tablets, but with cloud-based push messaging services matched with commercial usage analytics to help programmers align towards commercial success post deployment.

The company's VP of technology Ashley Streb contends that the way applications are often built now is "inefficient and unsustainable". While we now see hybrid applications and those built using HTML5 (but deployed as a native) starting to change the game for a proportion of development scenarios, Streb calls for a "layer of intelligence" (from cloud-based services) to help monitor factors such as number of installs, sessions, usage time, and average session length across apps.

Available as a Core, Pro, and Enterprise edition product, App Cloud provides a gateway to publishing an unlimited number of apps in a multi-platform compilation distribution-ready format. The open source JavaScript SDK with its native containers will allow access to native device APIs and, in theory, avoid having to learn platform-specific languages. Programmers may also pique their interest when they see the component library for touch-based functions supporting text, audio, video, images, and any kind of data.

According to Brightcove, the App Cloud platform also includes a workshop testing tool, on-device debugging functions, and open access to Internet content sources, including content management systems, blogs, and REST-based web services — plus limited use of App Cloud's Fast Feeds content optimization service for up to five of those sources.


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