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Ford: Connected Cars Are A Developer Platform


Real-time operational intelligence company Splunk and Ford have announced Connected Car Dashboards, a collaborative project that collected and analyzed data from vehicles to gain insight into driving patterns and vehicle performance.

Using Ford's OpenXC research platform to gather data from connected vehicles, Splunk data was indexed, analyzed, and visualized in Splunk Enterprise and made publicly available.

Ford OpenXC is a combination of open source hardware and software that enables developers to read data from the vehicle's internal communications network.

By installing a small hardware module to read and translate metrics from vehicles, the data becomes accessible to smartphone or tablet devices that can then be used to develop custom applications. Ford's OpenXC API enables vehicle data to be more accessible to developers by presenting them in an open, well-specified JSON format, which makes the data easier to use in external applications.

By utilizing the development environment in Splunk Enterprise, including an integrated web framework and software development kits for the world's most popular languages, developers can analyze and visualize this kind of data in real-time and against historical trends.

The Car Is a Platform

"The car is a platform, and we're excited by the opportunities that are emerging as we provide makers and developers with access to real-time vehicle data," said TJ Giuli, Silicon Valley research lab leader for Ford. "Collaborating with software companies like Splunk enables us to explore entirely new applications for vehicle data such as energy efficiency and driver habits."

"The Connected Car Dashboards give a glimpse into a promising future in which data could transform vehicle and driver safety as well as design, productivity, and other areas of the automotive industry," said Christy Wilson, vice president of product operations, Splunk.


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