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Forget Cross Platform, Try Massively Cross Platform


With the Windows Phone 8 SDK arrival this week, the rest of the industry is poised to add its expected layers of compatibility, integration, and interoperability. Not least of which in this space is appMobi, a firm that sets out to provide tools and services to support "massively cross platform app development" using JavaScript and HTML5.

The firm this week announced the addition of Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 to its list of supported mobile and desktop platforms. This development is intended to give developers who use JavaScript and HTML5 a means of creating apps for Windows 8 platforms (and other existing platforms) from a single JavaScript code base.

CEO of appMobi Dave Kennedy suggests that the benefits of adding Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 to appMobi's supported platforms runs both ways.

"Developers who use appMobi to build apps with JavaScript and HTML5 can now port them to the Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 with a simple rebuild. Conversely, developers using Visual Studio can now leverage appMobi's cross platform ecosystem to address iOS, Android, Windows 8, and Windows Phone 8 platforms without recoding in native languages."

Director of Windows Phone partner & developer programs at Microsoft Jean-Christophe Cimetiere is not far behind Kennedy in suggesting that it is important to minimize the friction for developers coming to Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8.

"By integrating its tools into Visual Studio, appMobi made it easy for developers to reuse their HTML5 and JavaScript skills," said Cimetiere.

These new app templates provide developers with code for supporting generic apps, web apps, accelerated games, and Facebook apps. appMobi has also integrated support for Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 into its appHub cross platform build tool.

With appHub, a single JavaScript/HTML5 app can be built into app store-ready binary files for iOS, Android, Facebook, Windows Phone, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Mozilla app stores.


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