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Jolt Awards: The Best Testing Tools

, May 01, 2012 The Annual Award for Best Testing Products
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Jolt Award For Excellence in Testing Tools

Selenium

The first sentence on the Selenium website succinctly sums up what the product does: "Selenium automates the web browser. That's it." As a result, a huge ecosystem of extensions and plug-ins have been created to make Selenium the default web application testing tool found in nearly all serious web developers' toolboxes.

Selenium comes in two flavors. The Selenium IDE is a Firefox add-on that macro-records user interactions for playback and analysis. The generated scripts can be edited and replayed for further customization. The second is the more comprehensive Selenium WebDriver, a language-specific set of bindings to automate web browser interactions. The Selenium API supports C#, Java, Perl, Python, and Ruby, as well as specific testing frameworks such as Bromine, Hermes, JUnit, NUnit, RSpec, and Unnittest among others. Given the level of flexible automation that Selenium has to offer, scripting tests of Web-based apps is remarkably easy. Most developers and testers should be able to learn frequently used commands in a few hours.

Selenium can drive both desktop and mobile browsers. It even offers an Android server APK that makes on-device browser testing a snap. An iOS version is also available, but requires it a bit more work to compile into the the RemoteWebDriver class into your iOS project.

If you tried Selenium a few years ago and thought it was a bit rough around the edges or that it lacked a feature you needed, you should do yourself a favor and check out the latest release. Selenium is a mature product with excellent documentation and support, and it benefits from more than 20 plug-ins that can perform everything from page coverage reports to taking screenshots of failed states for further analysis. Users seeking commercial Selenium support have several options, principally from the project's creator and sponsor, Sauce Labs.

All of this technology is available at no cost due to being open source. It's a high-quality package at a price that can't be beat; and for that, it was awarded this year's Jolt Award for Excellence in Testing Tools.

— Mike Riley






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