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MediaTek Wearable and IoT Developer Program


MediaTek has launched a developer program for wearable and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. The company, known for its fabless semiconductor company, and a systems-on-a-chip (SoC) for wireless communications technology, says that it is providing software development kits (SDKs), hardware development kits (HDKs), and technical documentation, as well as technical and business support.

Company VP Marc Naddell points out that his firm's developer program also features the LinkIt development platform, which is based on the MediaTek Aster (MT2502) chipset. LinkIt offers comparatively good integration (for the package size) and does away with the need for additional connectivity hardware. LinkIt uses MediaTek's reference design development model.

The LinkIt platform consists of the following components:

  • System-on-Chip (SoC) — MediaTek Aster (MT2502), the world's smallest commercial SoC for wearables, and companion Wi-Fi (MT5931) and GPS (MT3332) chipsets offering battery-efficient technology.
  • LinkIt OS — an operating system that enables control software and takes full advantage of the features of the Aster SoC, companion chipsets, and a wide range of sensors and peripheral hardware.
  • Hardware Development Kit (HDK) — Launching first with LinkIt ONE, a co-design project with Seeed Studio, the HDK will help add sensors, peripherals, and Arduino Shields to LinkIt ONE and create fully featured device prototypes.
  • Software Development Kit (SDK) — Makers can easily migrate existing Arduino code to LinkIt ONE using the APIs provided. In addition, they get a range of APIs to make use of the LinkIt communication features: GSM, GPRS, Bluetooth, and Wi-Fi.

"While makers still use their traditional industrial components for new connected IoT devices, with the LinkIt ONE hardware kit as part of MediaTek LinkIt Developer Platform, we're excited to help Makers bring prototypes to market faster and more easily," says Eric Pan, founder and chief executive officer of Seeed Studio.


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