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Sauce Labs Announces Sauce IDE



Sauce Labs has released Sauce IDE, a record and playback system for Selenium tests that allows individuals new to Selenium do automated application functional testing on multiple browsers including Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, Chrome and Opera and multiple operating systems, all without writing any code.

Selenium open source automated functional testing platform comes in two versions:

  • Selenium Remote Control (RC) allows cross-browser testing for developers comfortable with writing code in Java, Ruby, Python, C Sharp, or Perl.
  • Selenium IDE is a Firefox-only tool architected for new users. Sauce IDE, Sauce Labs' value-added distribution of Selenium IDE, allows a wider range of users to tap into the power of cross-browser testing without sophisticated knowledge of programming languages. Sauce IDE tests can be run via Sauce Labs' Sauce OnDemand cloud service, providing parallel-capable speed, ease of set up, and an instantaneous testing environment.

"Selenium users generally fall into two different camps -- coders who prefer Selenium RC and non-coders who tend to use Selenium IDE. There used to be no bridge between them," said Selenium creator Jason Huggins. "Sauce IDE bridges that gap by pre-wiring the option to tap directly into the Sauce OnDemand cloud-hosted Selenium service. You get access to a sophisticated test infrastructure without all the back breaking and mind-numbing work."

A key feature in Sauce IDE is record and playback. Users who select the Sauce OnDemand option within Sauce IDE get a video of every test that runs, providing a tangible record for review of either test verifications or failures.

"Sauce IDE lets users run Selenium tests across multiple browsers and operating systems without the headache of configuring and maintaining a test environment," added Sauce Labs' John Dunham. "Just select the Sauce OnDemand option within Sauce IDE and you instantly get the cross-browser testing, you get the video results, and you don't have to do anything differently other than clicking a button."


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