Channels ▼

Nick Plante

Dr. Dobb's Bloggers

Weekend Warriors

October 26, 2008

Who says you can't launch a web startup in a weekend? On October 18th and 19th, over 500 Ruby developers participated in a weekend-long development competition called the Rails Rumble, producing nearly a quarter million lines of code and 131 qualifying applications. Not bad, right? That's certainly a lot of code. But what's more interesting are the apps themselves, which are clearly more than the sum of their parts.

Take a look at some of the leaderboard entries to see what I mean. There's some great stuff here. Some truly polished, inspired ideas, fueled by fun, intelligent user interfaces. If you can't be bothered to explore each of them yourself, Leslie Poston over at Mashable has written up quick reviews of some of her favorites. It's a good way to get a sense of the variety of submissions introduced this year, as well as the increased quality over similar entries created in last years' competition.

What's more important than any individual app created during a contest like this though is instead what the exercise itself proves; with a team of 1-4 people who work well together, combined with some powerful tools like Ruby, Rails, and its vast sea of libraries and plugins, you can build some pretty impressive web properties in a very very small (but focused!) amount of time.

So it's official: you no longer have an excuse. Find a weekend, mark it off on your calendar, coordinate with a few other designer/developers, and get cranking on that idea you've been babbling about for the past 5 months but have yet to start prototyping. The only way to find out if it's really going to work is to do it, and launch a rough version 1. And there's never any better time than now. Who knows? It could be the start of something great.

If you're interested in finding out more about the Rumble (disclaimer: I am an one of the event oganizers), contest winners will be announced on November 2nd. In the meantime, you can head over and check out the leaderboard to see them for yourself. While you're there, since there's still time, you might as well register to vote and help us decide which of these apps deserves to live in Web 2.0.1 infamy! 

Related Reading


More Insights






Currently we allow the following HTML tags in comments:

Single tags

These tags can be used alone and don't need an ending tag.

<br> Defines a single line break

<hr> Defines a horizontal line

Matching tags

These require an ending tag - e.g. <i>italic text</i>

<a> Defines an anchor

<b> Defines bold text

<big> Defines big text

<blockquote> Defines a long quotation

<caption> Defines a table caption

<cite> Defines a citation

<code> Defines computer code text

<em> Defines emphasized text

<fieldset> Defines a border around elements in a form

<h1> This is heading 1

<h2> This is heading 2

<h3> This is heading 3

<h4> This is heading 4

<h5> This is heading 5

<h6> This is heading 6

<i> Defines italic text

<p> Defines a paragraph

<pre> Defines preformatted text

<q> Defines a short quotation

<samp> Defines sample computer code text

<small> Defines small text

<span> Defines a section in a document

<s> Defines strikethrough text

<strike> Defines strikethrough text

<strong> Defines strong text

<sub> Defines subscripted text

<sup> Defines superscripted text

<u> Defines underlined text

Dr. Dobb's encourages readers to engage in spirited, healthy debate, including taking us to task. However, Dr. Dobb's moderates all comments posted to our site, and reserves the right to modify or remove any content that it determines to be derogatory, offensive, inflammatory, vulgar, irrelevant/off-topic, racist or obvious marketing or spam. Dr. Dobb's further reserves the right to disable the profile of any commenter participating in said activities.

 
Disqus Tips To upload an avatar photo, first complete your Disqus profile. | View the list of supported HTML tags you can use to style comments. | Please read our commenting policy.
 


Dr. Dobb's TV