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Developer's Reading List

, July 17, 2012 Windows Debugging, Web Apps, JavaScript, and Clojure Lead the List of New Titles
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Also In the Hopper

Disciplined Agile Delivery, by Scott Ambler and Mark Lines. This is
Dr. Dobb's contributing editor Scott Ambler's 500-page handbook to agile in the enterprise. The central theme is that, for Agile techniques to work in the enterprise and on big projects, they must be applied with careful discipline. The authors base the techniques on Scrum and then draw from agile modeling, extreme programming, Unified Process, and Kanban to weave an approach that is practical and sensible, without the peculiarities that will make managers wince. (To wit, pair programming appears exactly once, in passing, in the book.) This book is a hands-on field manual that explains adoption of agile and proper execution of the "Disciplined" part.

Embedded Systems Security, by David and Mike Kleidermacher
An omnibus overview of security threats on embedded systems along with discussions of how to address them. Some actual hacks are presented, but primarily in discussion form, rather than at a code level. The discussions of embedded cryptography and data protection protocols are particularly extensive. The book contains only a little code (all of it in C), so it's primarily a discussion of the problems and the available solutions, rather than a volume targeted specifically at developers.

The Manga Guide to Linear Algebra, by Shin Takahashi, et al.
Linear algebra will appear to many developers as an esoteric topic unlikely to have much use in their daily work. That might be so in the abstract, but in rendering graphics or GPU programming, linear algebra — that is, the arithmetic of matrices — is a core skill. The book presents the fundamentals using Manga, the Japanese comic-book style that primarily involves wide-eyed adolescents teaching themselves the topic in a conversation that has flirtatious undertones. This makes the material easy to leaf through and learn in a quick, enjoyable fashion.
Dr. Dobb's Staff






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