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HTML5 And The BYOD Missing Link


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HTML5 frameworks and tools company Sencha has announced Sencha Space, a managed environment for deploying mobile business applications.

Currently available as a developer preview, Sencha isn't shy about how it is positioning this product and calls it "the missing link" to multi-device app development and management.

The firm says that businesses cannot keep up with the management and security challenges created by the end user-driven BYOD (bring your own device) movement.

According to Sencha, "While the maturation, capabilities, and growing popularity of HTML5 has made it easy to develop high-quality mobile applications that can run on any smartphone or tablet, IT departments, developers, and end users are still struggling to find an ideal balance between the BYOD world and corporate IT requirements."

Developers can use this tool to tap into a set of device-level APIs, all conforming to IT security and management policies. Sencha Space is positioned as a secure business environment for enterprise application developers to target for deploying their HTML5 applications.

Sencha CTO Abraham Elias says that Space's administrative console empowers IT managers with complete control of who can and cannot access a company's mobile business applications, including the ability to make real-time changes according to specific devices and applications.

"The enterprise mobility management market has seen rapid growth and development in recent years, and the next phase in its natural evolution will be the growth in secure and managed mobile environments as increasing numbers of businesses deploy apps across multiple device types," said Richard Absalom, analyst at Ovum. "Enterprises and SMBs are beginning to realize that the security and management of applications is key to getting business value out of the multiple devices that employees are using at work, whether these devices are corporate or personally owned."


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