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This Week's Developer Reading List


A list of book releases compiled by Dr. Dobb’s to keep you up-to-date on software development tools and techniques.

A Developer’s Guide to Amazon SimpleDB
by Mocky Habeeb
This is a guide to building cloud computing solutions with Amazon DB, a web service providing structured data storage in the cloud, backed by clusters of Amazon-managed database servers. Habeeb tours the SimpleDB platform and APIs, explains their essential characteristics and tradeoffs. The book also serves discusses aspects of writing, deploying, querying, optimizing, and securing Amazon SimpleDB apps.
http://www.informit.com/title/0321623630

Pragmatic Guide to Git(Beta)
by Travis Swicegood
Git, with its excellent merging capabilities, coupled with its speed and relative ease of use, make it an indispensable tool for any developer. New Git users will learn the basic tasks needed to work with Git every day, including working with remote repositories, dealing with branches and tags, exploring the history, and fixing problems when things go wrong. If you’re already familiar with Git, this book will serve as a reference for Git commands and best practices. This title is currently available in "Beta." If you buy the eBook now, you'll be able to download successive releases of the eBook as the authors add material and correct mistakes. You'll get the final eBook when the book is finished. If you buy the combo pack (Beta eBook plus the finished Paper Book) now, you'll get the Beta eBook immediately, and you'll get the finished paper book when it's released.
http://www.pragprog.com/titles/pg_git/pragmatic-guide-to-git

Service-Oriented Design with Ruby and Rails
by Paul Dix, with Trotter Cashion, Bryan Helmkamp, and Jake Howerton
This book is a guide to building highly scalable, services-based Rails applications. Dix introduces a services-based design approach to leverage the full benefits of both Ruby and Rails, while overcoming the difficulties of working with larger codebases and teams. Key concepts are explained with detailed Ruby code built using open source libraries such as ActiveRecord, Sinatra, Nokogiri, and Typhoeus.
http://www.informit.com/title/0321659368.


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