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Appmethod For C++ Android Apps


This week sees the release of Appmethod, meaning that C++ developers can create complete apps for Android, iOS, Windows, and Mac OS X using this multi-device application development software offered by Embarcadero Technologies.

Embarcadero is upbeat and downbeat on Android, and says that while Android offers the largest addressable market opportunity for app developers, developing C++ Android applications has "fallen short" on developer productivity.

The latest release of Appmethod includes a "Free Forever" subscription plan that C++ developers can use to create Android apps to be published on any public app store (e.g., Amazon App Store and Google Play). Appmethod also enables developers to build and publish apps for all other supported device platforms for 30 days, and provides access to Appmethod Enterprise Mobility Services.

So then Appmethod is the first C++ visual development environment and component-based application framework for Android, iOS, Mac OS X, Windows, and wearables like Google Glass. Appmethod streamlines multi-device development efforts by enabling developers to create natively compiled applications for all major platforms with one effort and a single, common source codebase.

The software offers a component framework and a large set of user interface controls. From buttons and listviews, to tab management, Appmethod provides over 100 cross-platform UI controls with a common API that deliver the native experience. It also natively compiles the app to run directly on the CPU, ensuring developers deliver the fastest apps for the best user experience.

"Appmethod's Enterprise Mobility Services can be used to securely expose custom APIs over REST/JSON, access Enterprise data from major database vendors with the included SQL database connectors, and provide a secure, embedded, and server database. Appmethod also features a common component API for MBaaS services, like push notifications, user management, and storage (files and objects)," said Michael Swindell, Embarcadero SVP of products.


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